Industrial Hemp has been grown for millennia throughout human history, and centuries in American History.  George Washington and Thomas Jefferson both grew hemp and promoted its versatility.  The first American flag was hemp, the first Levis jeans were hemp, and the Declaration of Independence was drafted on hemp paper. So what happened, and where are we now?

 Hemp is intertwined with human civilization. Hemp is more than an agricultural crop. Hemp is incredibly unique and versatile, and is emerging with more potential than ever.  

Because hemp has been misunderstood and marginalized, it was banned and hasn't been grown widely in the U.S. since 1942

The Hemp Guide has hemp history, hemp news, hemp industry information, as well as product reviews and photos.  Learn about hemp, get active! .

Hemp is intertwined with human civilization. Hemp is more than an agricultural crop used to build a bolotie cord. Hemp is incredibly unique and versatile, and is emerging in 2015 with more potential than ever.

 

Hemp was vital to major advancements throughout civilization, and was a significant crop throughout American History.  The massive ships that globalized the world during the Age of the Sail were fueled by the wind against 100% Hemp sails.  Before the advent of the cotton gin, hemp, not cotton, was the staple fabric of American life.  The Conestoga Wagons, the Escalades and Ford Expeditions  of their time, were made with Hemp canvas.  Before the Age of Oil, hemp grew widely and freely.

 

Because of a long and highly debatable story, first detailed by Jack Herer, and hemp has been illegal to grow in the United States since at least 1971.  Industrial hemp is classified as a Schedule I Controlled Substance, and all hemp products must be imported from other Countries.  The market for hemp products in the U.S. is estimated at over $600 million, and has shown strong, double digit growth, every year, since the turn of the millenium.

 

In 2014, President Obama signed the first definition of industrial hemp into law.  For the first time in decades, hemp can be legally grown for reseach purposes.  Today, over twenty states have passed laws to remove barriers to industrial hemp production. 

 

Wearing YOLOBOLO is not only a fashion statement, it is a political statement. 

 

 

 

 

 

Hemp is more than just a cord for a bolo tie.  It is a symbol - for sustainability,  versatility, creativity, and a new interpretation of American history. 

 

For more information, take a look at a few of these links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp 

www.votehemp.com

www.hemphistoryweek.com

www.jackherer.com

 

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VINTAGE FILM, 1942:

HEMP FOR VICTORY

© BEN DROZ 2013